• Broken Treaties

    Time after time, the United States has not lived up to its treaty obligations, failing the Cherokee people.
  • Our Land, Our Resources

    When the U.S. began occupying Cherokee lands, the two governments entered into agreements guaranteeing the federal government would manage Cherokee Nation land and resources for the benefit of the Cherokee people.
  • Failed Federal Policies

    The federal government mismanaged certain Cherokee lands and resources, including money. Cherokee people have suffered hardships because of that and are left wondering why the federal government failed them.
  • Left Behind

    These resources should have been used to benefit Cherokee people. Accurate accounting of the Cherokee Nation’s resources held in trust may have meant more funding to programs that assist elders in need of health care, housing and nutritional programs.
  • Protect the Next Generation

    When it has been free of federal control, the Cherokee Nation has remained a good steward of its resources and improved the lives of Cherokees. The federal government owes the Cherokee people a proper accounting of its management of tribal resources to right the wrongs for future generations.
  • Working Together Brings Endless Possibilities

    The Cherokee Nation urges the United States to fulfill its longstanding trust responsibilities and treaty obligations by ensuring the tribe’s trust funds and resources are and were managed efficiently and effectively for the benefit of the Cherokee people.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • Broken Treaties

    Time after time, the United States has not lived up to its treaty obligations, failing the Cherokee people.
  • Our Land, Our Resources

    When the U.S. began occupying Cherokee lands, the two governments entered into agreements guaranteeing the federal government would manage Cherokee Nation land and resources for the benefit of the Cherokee people.
  • Failed Federal Policies

    Prior to the late 1970s, the federal government mismanaged certain Cherokee lands and resources, including money. Cherokee people have suffered hardships because of that and are left wondering why the federal government failed them.
  • Left Behind

    These resources should have been used to benefit Cherokee people. Accurate accounting of the Cherokee Nation’s resources held in trust may have meant more funding to programs that assist elders in need of health care, housing and nutritional programs.
  • PROTECT THE NEXT GENERATION

    Since taking control of its own assets in 1978, the Cherokee Nation has remained a good steward of its resources and improved the lives of Cherokees. The federal government owes the Cherokee people a proper accounting of its management of tribal resources to right the wrongs for future generations.
  • Working Together Brings Endless Possibilities

    The Cherokee Nation urges the United States to fulfill its longstanding trust responsibilities and treaty obligations by ensuring the tribe’s trust funds and resources are and were managed efficiently and effectively for the benefit of the Cherokee people.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6

History

As part of the historical relationship between the Cherokee Nation and the United States, the federal government held certain money, land and other resources in trust for the Cherokee Nation that were required by treaty to be used for the tribe’s benefit.

Treaties

When the United States began occupying Cherokee Nation’s land, the two governments entered into numerous treaties. Those agreements often required the federal government to manage the Cherokee Nation’s vast lands and resources for the benefit of the tribe.

Filing

Cherokee Nation has filed a trust accounting claim against the United States requesting it provide a full and complete accounting of the Cherokee Nation’s funds, assets and resources as well as an accounting system for reporting future balances.

FAQs

There are numerous questions about the federal government’s handling of Cherokee Nation’s trust resources. Until 1978, the U.S. was legally charged with managing these assets and providing a reporting to the Cherokee Nation of its trust.

Updates

The Cherokee Nation announced on November 28, 2016, that it has filed a claim against the United States asking for an accounting of its resources and assets that are held in trust by the federal government. Follow this link for the status of the claim.